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AI-driven security is no longer optional: "It's a requirement"

AI-driven security is no longer optional: "It's a requirement"

Originally posted by Sara Barker @ itbrief.com.au

More cybersecurity professionals believe that artificial intelligence can improve security now more than ever before, because it can draw on the ever-growing amount of data captured and analysed from the internet of things.

According to a study by BlackBerry Cylance, titled Security Gets Smart with AI, cyber defence, malware prevention and advanced threat detection will be key uses for AI in future.

“Given the increasing threat landscape and our exploding reliance on IoT devices, the potential for digital malfeasance grows rapidly too, highlighting the need for sophisticated defensive strategies,” comments BlackBerry Cylance chief information and technology officer, Kumud Kalia. 

“The adoption of AI is critical for security teams to gain predictive advantage, particularly to protect against malware and to detect and respond to traditionally evasive non-malware threats. As we have demonstrated at BlackBerry Cylance, AI can deliver incredibly powerful results across mobile, fixed, and cloud-based security environments.“

Security professionals also look to AI for decision management and regulatory compliance.

“AI-powered security solutions will continue to gain in prominence as organisations look to market for the latest tools that allow them to be proactive and adaptive rather than reactive in addressing security threats,” adds BlackBerry Cylance vice president of product marketing, Sasi Murthy. 

Across all industries, survey respondents sought the use of AI to better identify unknown threats. These threats are the most challenging threats to address without a predictive advantage.

Respondents also saw AI as an enabler of more effective, holistic approaches to protection; improved capture and use of threat intelligence; reduction in time between infection and remediation; real-time alerts of anomalous behaviour; and better use of existing investments and human analysts.

“To reduce risk of advanced threats, predictive AI-driven security is no longer an option: It’s a requirement,” Murthy concludes.

The study asked 261 corporate and government security professionals about their thoughts on AI. 

Key findings from the survey:

  • The top three technologies considered part of an AI-enabled solution are predictive analytics (76%), deep learning platforms (74%), and machine learning platforms (73%)

  • The top three use cases for AI are cyber defence (75%), malware prevention (71%), and advanced threat detection and prevention (69%)

  • Experience with AI: While 57% of respondents said they are using or plan to use AI-driven security solutions, only 35% have direct experience with such platforms

  • Technology maturity: 46% consider AI-based security solutions to be maturing; however, lack of technology maturity is a barrier to adoption

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